• Group Cycling
  • Rotation Cycling
Feature

"Group Cycling"

Actual Competition Point For the purpose of preserving your legs during group cycling, it's very effective to control your cycling pace and make use of the slipstream effect.

Points on Group Cycling

POINT

When cycling with a group on a flat course race, you want to prevent overexerting your legs as much as possible. To achieve this, since you are in a group, the pedaling efficiency may not be very high, so use can use your lifted leg to give yourself bigger pushes of torque to maintain your pace. According to that, an output of 223 watts would be equivalent to 47 km/h.

Large Torque Zone
  1. Pushing forward foot
  2. Stepping down foot
  3. Pulling foot
  4. Lifting foot

Pedaling Coaching

When cycling in a group, use pedaling displays and torque curves, keep your raised leg in mind and always aim to maintain your longest torque zone. If you can do this, maintaining a high cycling pace is possible.

Feature

"Rotation Cycling"

Actual Competition Point In order to maintain high speeds when doing rotation cycling, it is essential to make proper use of the slipstream effect and to properly use the efficiency of each cyclist.

Important Points for Pedaling in Lead Position

POINT

To reduce the amount of speed loss when facing strong air resistance, it is imperative to increase your pedaling efficiency.

Large Torque Zone
Speed: 42.6km
  1. Pushing forward foot
  2. Stepping down foot
  3. Pulling foot
  4. Lifting foot

Important Points for Pedaling in Standby Position

POINT

It is imperative, after being released from a pocket of large air resistance, that a small group's rotation should conserve their energy to match the energy of the middle cyclist and everyone should try to match the pace and power control of the lead cyclist.

Speed: 43.1km

Pedaling Coaching

Since the lead cyclist encounters all of the air resistance, he should be aware of his leg efficiency and should strive to maintain good pedaling efficiency. The rear cyclists should be aware of how much power they are exerting and should try to match their power control and energy savings to the other rear cyclists.